Marie Hell

This post is sponsored by Marie Hell. I was compensated for my work and received garments for review. 


I'm excited to share a collection of beautiful, sustainable dresses with you today by designer Marie Hell. I haven't been this smitten by a brand in awhile, likely because, as I told my contact there, "everything you make comes in my favorite colors!". 

Marie Hell dresses come in simple, basic colors and silhouettes. They're meant to help build a capsule/minimal wardrobe through their versatility. I love the company's motto: "at Marie Hell, we believe you don't need a million things in your closet... just a few that you love". 

How are Marie Hell dresses made? and why are the prices higher than other knit dresses?

First, the fabric. Unlike most knit dresses I've owned, the jersey that Marie Hell dresses are cut from is a thick, soft knit that doesn't cling of show every bump and line. It holds its shape beautifully.  The fabric is made with natural fibers (wood pulp milled in California!) and is biodegradable- something that's more rare with a stretchy jersey! The dying process for the fabric is Bluesign-certified and environmentally friendly as well. 

Next, the wages. Marie Hell dresses are made in the USA, and worker wages begin at $11-$12/hr then increase based on tenure. I'm so thrilled that Marie Hell is radically transparent and actually willing to give consumers the information they ask for. As a blogger, it is usually incredibly difficult for me to pry information out of "ethical" brands to share with you, and I think that it speaks volumes of Marie Hell's integrity and the company's intentions that they are so confident in their transparency. 

When Marie Hell asked me to review and photograph a few dresses (that's another thing I love about Marie Hell- you can view the dresses on different people through the "styled by" section on the website), I chose Quiver Tunic in black and the Submit Dress in heather grey. 

When you purchase a Marie Hell dress, make sure it's a style you'll want to wear for years and years to come, a piece that you can really invest in and wear often. It's a dress that will last.